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Cooking Steaks on a Blackstone Griddle

5 from 12 votes

Forget the BBQ and fire up your Blackstone griddle to make some of the most amazing steaks you’ll ever feast on! Cooking steaks on a Blackstone griddle is easy, and with a perfect sear and oodles of flavor, making steaks Blackstone-style is mess-free! Hungry? Read on and I, Chef Jenn, will show you all my tips and tricks to make them perfectly every time!

steak on a blackstone griddle cooked with butter on top

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With a good sear, plenty of melting fat, and meat that’s tender and not overcooked, cooking steak on a Blackstone Griddle is easy and once you’ve mastered the technique, you’ll never want it any other way!

I particularly love the fact that I can cook steaks thick or thin on the griddle, and with my 36-inch Blackstone, I can make enough for just the family or for a crowd.

What You Need to Make Steak on a Blackstone Griddle

What Kinds of Steaks Can You Cook on a Blackstone Griddle?

Here’s the easy answer – any kind! From beef to bison, buffalo, and venison, you can cook any kind of steak on the griddle.

My favorite steaks are ribeyes. They have lots of good fat that’s marbled throughout which gets all melty keeping the meat juicy. If you’re using a leaner cut, like a New York Strip, you may need to add more fat to the cooking process to keep the meat juicy.

ribeye steaks on cutting board

What is Herb Butter?

Also called compound butter, herb butter will take your steak to new levels! Take a stick of butter, a clove of garlic, and some of your favorite herbs (about 2 tablespoons dried or 1/4 cup fresh). Pop it all into a food processor and pulse it until it’s all combined.

Then, plop the butter down on a piece of plastic wrap and roll it into a tube, using the plastic to help you form it into a cylinder about 1-inch thick. Refrigerate this and slice off discs of garlicky-herby butter as you need them!

You can also just mash it all up in a bowl and add a dollop when you need it.

This kind of butter is a chef’s secret weapon! Try it not just on steaks, but on grilled shrimp, veggies, a baked potato, or garlic bread!

compound butter in a bowl

How To Make Steaks on a Blackstone Griddle

  1. Fire up the Blackstone griddle. Give it a good 10 minutes to get nice and hot. If you have multiple burners, use as many burners as you need to cook the steaks with at least a few inches between each steak.
  2. The Blackstone should be set to the highest temperature to get a good sear on the steaks. Don’t worry, we’ll turn it down in a bit.
  3. Dry the steaks with some paper towel. To get a good sear, your steaks need to be dry. Any moisture will create a barrier preventing the natural caramelization of the meat.
  4. Season your steaks liberally with 1/2 tablespoon of seasoning. My favorite all-in-one steak seasoning is Montreal Steak Seasoning. It’s got a good balance of salt, pepper, and garlic. I like to keep it simple, but you can use your favorite spice blend or rub. Just watch it doesn’t have sugar in it – sugar can burn at this high temperature.
  5. Add a splash of oil to your cooking surface – squirt bottles work great for this and they’re fun, too! Just keep them away from the kids!!
  6. When the oil is shimmering, place your steaks on the griddle surface. Don’t touch them for a good 2-3 minutes! You should hear lots of sizzling – that’s good!
  7. Use tongs to lift the steaks and flip them over – if the steak seems to be sticking to the surface, it needs more time to sear. A good sear will release the steak from the cooking surface.
  8. Flip the steaks over and move them slightly – the Blackstone surface will be hotter if there were no steaks previously on that exact spot. Sear for another 2-3 minutes.
  9. Thinner steaks could be cooked at this point so check for doneness – if your steaks need more time to cook, drop the temperature of the Blackstone and shift the steaks to a cooler spot.
  10. Cook the steaks over a medium heat and use a meat thermometer to pull them at your preferred level of doneness.
  11. Top the steaks with about a tablespoon of that delish herb butter, let it melt into it, and enjoy!

How Do I Know My Steak is Cooked?

Here’s a handy chart to help you figure out what the temperature means on your digital meat thermometer:

Rare120-125F
Medium Rare125-130F
Medium135F ish
Medium Well140-145F
Well Done150-160F

What About Super Thin Steaks?

steaks cooking on the blackstone
Steaks cooking on the Blackstone Griddle

Every once in a while Costco sells giant slabs of ribeye or New York strip steaks. I wrestle one of those hunks home and cut them into thin (think 1/4-inch to 1/3-inch) steaks, vacuum seal these, and use them for quick dinners.

These steaks cook SUPER FAST on the griddle top. For super-thin steaks like this, I recommend searing for 1 minute on each side, and then your steak might be done!

Chef Jenn’s Tips

  • When buying steaks, fat is your friend! You want to see lots of white marbling in the meat itself – big layers of fat on the outside of the steak are just going to drive up the weight of the steak, and the price. Marbling is key!
  • Costco sells Choice grade beef – it’s more marbled than grocery store Select grade beef.
  • Always rest your steaks before cutting into them – this will help them stay juicy and they won’t be a mess on your plate.
  • Give the Blackstone griddle plenty of time to heat up – a cold griddle won’t make a great steak!
  • Mix and match your favorite herbs, dried or fresh, to make compound butter.
  • Use a digital thermometer to get an accurate reading of your steak’s doneness!
  • Have a sous vide? Try the steaks sous vide and then reverse sear them on your Blackstone – delish!

What To Serve With Blackstone Seared Steaks

Baked potatoes, creamed spinach, and fried mushrooms are typical steakhouse accompaniments for steak, but you can mix things up and try something new. Here are some recommendations:

How To Store Leftover Steaks

Technically you CAN freeze leftover steak. I’d vacuum seal it to protect it, and then either eat it cold (thawed!) or warm it in a skillet on the stovetop. It is going to overcook, so serve it with some gravy or something juicy.

Ideally, you don’t have leftover steak to worry about! If you do, wrap it tightly and store it in the fridge for 3-4 days. Heat it slowly in a pan on the stove, or fire up the griddle to warm it back up. Keep the heat low so you don’t overcook it too much. Leftover steak doesn’t have to be hot! Try it cold on a salad – it’s delish!

Frequently Asked Questions

Are steaks good on a Blackstone?

Heck yes! With a good sear and compound butter, steaks on the griddle are just as good as on a grill!

Is a Blackstone griddle worth it?

If you have the space for outdoor cooking, then YES!!! Think of this as a giant cast iron pan. I can cook an entire meal on it without heating up the kitchen, and with way less mess! For breakfast I can make a pile of pancakes, sausage, bacon, eggs, and more. For lunch, try cooking 6 grilled cheese sandwiches at once! Dinners are a snap, too, and it’s all fun to cook!

Can you cook a frozen steak on a Blackstone griddle.

I don’t recommend it. The steak will cook on the outside and the inside could be still frozen! It is difficult to cook frozen meat at the best of times, but it is harder on the griddle because of the heat source. It’s best to plan ahead and let those steaks thaw in the fridge overnight.

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cooked steak on the blackstone griddle
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5 from 12 votes

Steaks on the Blackstone Griddle

Perfectly seared, juicy, and flavorful, cooking steaks on the Blackstone Griddle is easy!
Course Main Course
Cuisine American
Keyword blackstone, blackstone griddle, seared steaks, steak, steak on the blackstone
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Servings 4 people

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Fire up the Blackstone griddle. Give it a good 10 minutes to get nice and hot. If you have multiple burners, use as many burners as you need to cook the steaks with at least a few inches between each steak.
  • The Blackstone should be set to the highest temperature to get a good sear on the steaks. Don't worry, we'll turn it down in a bit.
  • Dry the steaks with some paper towel. To get a good sear, your steaks need to be dry. Any moisture will create a barrier preventing the natural caramelization of the meat.
  • Season your steaks liberally with 1/2 tablespoon of seasoning.
  • Add a splash of oil to your cooking surface.
  • When the oil is shimmering, place your steaks on the griddle surface. Don't touch them for a good 2-3 minutes! You should hear lots of sizzling – that's good!
  • Use tongs to lift the steaks and flip them over – if the steak seems to be sticking to the surface, it needs more time to sear. A good sear will release the steak from the cooking surface.
  • Flip the steaks over and move them slightly – the Blackstone surface will be hotter if there were no steaks previously on that exact spot. Sear for another 2-3 minutes.
  • Thinner steaks could be cooked at this point so check for doneness – if your steaks need more time to cook, drop the temperature of the Blackstone and shift the steaks to a cooler spot.
  • Cook the steaks over a medium heat and use a meat thermometer to pull them at your preferred level of doneness.
  • Top the steaks with about a tablespoon of compound butter, let it melt into it, and enjoy!

A Note on Nutritional Information

Nutritional information for this recipe is provided as a courtesy and is calculated based on available online ingredient information. It is only an approximate value. The accuracy of the nutritional information for any recipe on this site cannot be guaranteed.

By Chef Jenn

6 thoughts on “Cooking Steaks on a Blackstone Griddle”

  1. 5 stars
    Thank you Chef Jenn for another wonderful Blackstone Griddle recipe!! Your tips have helped me overcome my fear of cooking steaks on my griddle. My family loved your recipe!!

    Reply

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